Sunday, November 22, 2015

CANNELLONI

It is said that Antonino Ercolano was already serving them in 1800. He had invented the little La Favorita trattoria in order to turn to account the culinary arts he had learnt as a seminarian at the archbishopric. He had not managed to become a priest, but for his friends and for all Sorrento he had nevertheless earned the affectionate nickname “O’ Parrucchiano” – the parish priest. 
And in the two little rooms on Corso Italia he had also invented a highly personal way of preparing gussets of pasta rolled up any old how and filled with a rich tomato sauce and a smidgen of meat, all covered in tomato: he called them strascinati – from the amusing way he had of rolling out and pulling the pasta with his rolling pin.
In the early 1920s, when Sorrento was an must on the Grand Tour of the European aristocracy, Salvatore Coletta, the cook, rolled them up in great style, being more generous with the meat and changing the name to “cannelloni”. They were an overnight success, thanks in part to the work of Federico Nicola, a cook at the Favorita for over thirty years.


Wednesday, November 4, 2015

VILLA NOLA

Antonio de Simone is professor of archaeology at the Benincasa University in Naples: ‘‘Augustus became the master of the world at a very young age. At 72 years old, which compared to the average lifespan of a Roman made him more like over 100, he’s tired. He doesn’t want anything more to do with power. He’s left Rome with the worries, anxieties which come with power and spends the last years of his life travelling or staying in houses which are outside Rome. On his return from one journey, tired and sick, he prefers the villa of Nola, even though he has more beautiful and more important villas in the area.”

Read more at: http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.gr/2015/10/villa-nola-final-resting-place-of-roman.html#.VjRv8iuGPh4
Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook
Antonio de Simone is professor of archaeology at the Benincasa University in Naples: ‘‘Augustus became the master of the world at a very young age. At 72 years old, which compared to the average lifespan of a Roman made him more like over 100, he’s tired. He doesn’t want anything more to do with power. He’s left Rome with the worries, anxieties which come with power and spends the last years of his life travelling or staying in houses which are outside Rome. On his return from one journey, tired and sick, he prefers the villa of Nola, even though he has more beautiful and more important villas in the area.”

Read more at: http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.gr/2015/10/villa-nola-final-resting-place-of-roman.html#.VjRv8iuGPh4
Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook
Antonio de Simone is professor of archaeology at the Benincasa University in Naples: ‘‘Augustus became the master of the world at a very young age. At 72 years old, which compared to the average lifespan of a Roman made him more like over 100, he’s tired. He doesn’t want anything more to do with power. He’s left Rome with the worries, anxieties which come with power and spends the last years of his life travelling or staying in houses which are outside Rome. On his return from one journey, tired and sick, he prefers the villa of Nola, even though he has more beautiful and more important villas in the area.”

Read more at: http://archaeologynewsnetwork.blogspot.gr/2015/10/villa-nola-final-resting-place-of-roman.html#.VjRv8iuGPh4
Follow us: @ArchaeoNewsNet on Twitter | groups/thearchaeologynewsnetwork/ on Facebook
Vesuvius erupted again in 472 AD this time smoothering the villa where the Emperor Augustus ended his days.The archaeological treasure has been under excavation for the past 13 years.The dig has reveled some extraordinary finds like never before seen frescoes.
According to the ancient historians Tacitus and Suetonius, this villa close to Nola, is the place where an ailing Augustus escaped the mayhem of Rome, before he passed away on 19 August 14 AD.
Antonio de Simone is professor of archeology at the Benincasa University in Naples:
‘‘Augustus became the master of the world at a very young age. At 72 years old, which compared to the average lifespan of a Roman made him more like over 100, he’s tired. He’s left Rome with the worries, anxieties which come with power and spends the last years of his life travelling or staying in houses which are outside Rome. On his return from one journey, tired and sick, he prefers the villa of Nola, even though he has more beautiful and more important villas in the area.”