Thursday, July 20, 2017

BORGO DEI VERGINI

The Vergini neighbourhood was built on top of a cemetery dating to the 4th Century BC, when Naples was the ancient Greek city of Neapolis. And according to local archaeologist Carlo Leggieri, the site was as significant then as it is now.
“These monuments marked the tombs of the aristocracy of ancient Neapolis – all the influential people of one of the biggest and most important cities on the Mediterranean,” he said.
Its status didn’t last. As the centuries passed, the cemetery disappeared beneath layers of flood and construction debris. Now it is an inadvertent catacomb, entombed 8m to 10m below the city.
The Naples National Archaeological Museum will partner with several associations Рincluding SMMAVE, Celanapoli and VerginiSanità Рthrough its Obvia outreach programme, where museum ticket buyers can get discounted tours of association-maintained sites.

Sunday, July 2, 2017

VEDI NAPOLI

This exhibition proposes to use the languages of contemporaneity to analyze the most stereotyped rhetoric about Naples. The goal is not to disrupt and deconstruct redundant signs and meanings that have become firmly established, in favor of images and ideas that are new, unusual, and perhaps even truer. On the contrary, the intention is to fully engage that code, taking it seriously as a machine for the production of functional forms and as a protective device against dysfunctional disorder. 
Matthias Schaller has looked for and portrayed some of the latest stereotypes of what it means to be Neapolitan: situations, monuments, personalities that are strongly representative of the city. He has always taken photographs, but here he has decided to photograph other photographs.